Pack Program

Welcome to the 24th Kitchener Cub Pack.

Below you will find some general information about our Cub Pack.

More information is found on pull down links under the Cubs button on the Menu Bar at the top or at the right.

Check out the Pack Calendar and find upcoming information at Pack News.

Email:  cubs@24th.ca

When?

Thursdays from 7pm to 8:30pm.
September thru May.

Where?

Generally we meet at St. James’-Rosemount United Church but
make sure you check the Pack Calendar for special meeting times and places.

Who?

Youth ages 8 – 10 years

How & Why?

“Do Your Best” nicely sums up the approach to the activities of our Cubs.
Cubs need adult support and approval as they play, learn and discover.
Children need this for building self-esteem and self-confidence. It is critical for them to feel a sense of accomplishment for what they did, rather than being taught that only winning counts.  Scouting believes that Cubs who “do their best” in any activity deserve equal recognition and praise.


Cub Promise

C14XCLR

I promise to do my best
To love and serve God, to do my duty to the Queen;
To keep the law of the Wolf Cub pack,
And to do a good turn for somebody every day.

Cub Law

(i) The Cub respects the Old Wolf *,
(ii) The Cub respects himself.

* (an “Old Wolf” refers to a leader or any respected adult)

Cub Motto

Do Your Best

Cub Program Goals

In order to fulfill Scouting’s principles and mission, the Cub program is geared specifically to meet the developmental needs of most 8-10 year olds. The program emphasizes activities which encourage Cubs to:

  • express and respond to God’s love in their daily livesC22XCLR copy
  • do their best
  • keep fit
  • satisfy their curiosity, and need for adventure and new experiences
  • be creative and develop a sense of accomplishment
  • make choices
  • develop a sense of fair play, trust and caring
  • work together in small groups, and experience being a leader
  • participate in outdoor activities
  • learn about the natural world and their part in it.

In Wolf Cubs, “Do Your Best”  (DYB)nicely sums up the approach to activities described in this book. Cubs need adult support and approval as they play, learn and discover. Children need this for building self-esteem and self-confidence. It is critical for them to feel a sense of accomplishment for what they did, rather than being taught that only winning counts. Scouting believes that Cubs who “do their best” in any activity deserve equal recognition and praise.

How Packs Are Organized

Rock CircleThe Wolf Cub theme is based on Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book. It provides a sense of outdoor adventure and fantasy that appeals to a Cub’s imaginative mind. The “pack” refers to all members in your child’s Cub program. Within the pack, Cubs are broken into small groups called “sixes”. A Cub who is asked to lead a “six” is called a “sixer”. The Sixer has an assistant called a “second”. Cubs usually rotate through these early leadership jobs based on age and experience.
The primary adult leader of the pack is referred to as “Akela” — the name of the old wolf and leader of the pack in The Jungle Book. Other leaders take a “jungle name” such as Baloo (the bear), or Bagheera (the panther). Your pack may also have a “Kim” — a Scout who works with the Cubs. Kim is another Kipling character. Older Cubs are sometimes invited to work with a Beaver colony. Each Cub helper working in a colony is called “Keeo”, after a character in the Beaver book Friends of the Forest.

The leaders in your Cub’s pack are supported by a group committee. The committee is responsible for ensuring the programs offered meet Scouts Canada’s guidelines and that the pack has enough resources to operate effectively. The group committee represents a sponsor which is the overall partner with Scouts Canada. Sponsors are typically community centres, clubs, religious institutions or parent groups. The sponsor
works closely with Scouts Canada to ensure Scouting programs and resources are meeting the needs of all its youth and adult members.

After learning a bit about Cubs, your child will be ready to become “invested”, or formally welcomed, into the pack. You will be invited to attend the “investiture ceremony” to help welcome your child into the Cub pack.

A Parents Role in Cubbing

Scouting is a family-based organization. Activities we offer, plus the values and skills we provide, are aimed at supporting your efforts to teach your child what is needed to become a well-rounded person. Your personal involvement is important to help reinforce the lessons your Cub learns. Here are some suggestions to help you become involved:

  • Sit down with your child and look through the Cub book together. What activities do you find interesting or appealing? How could you work on these activities as a family?
  • Find out what activities leaders plan to run in your child’s pack. Most leaders set aside time at the first meeting to ask Cubs what they would like to do. They draw up program plans from the children’s input.
  • Get to know leaders by their real names. Too often parents only know leaders by their “jungle” names.  Leaders are truly interested in your child’s welfare. Tell them what your child likes to do. This will help them plan fun activities.
  • If your Cub is interested in working on an activity outside of the meeting, or you want to make it a family project, talk over your plans with the leaders. They can provide useful tips and tell you how well it fits into the weekly programs.
  • Your talents, hobbies and interests are great program assets worth sharing with children. Find out how you can become a resource for the pack’s programs.  This will let you spend valuable time with your child and share experience.  Cubs really enjoy showing off for an adult family member who attends a meeting. This sense of pride helps strengthen adult-child relations.
  • When your child joins Cubs, you become part of the pack’s support team.   Become a leader.  Scouts Canada offers up-to-date training and resource materials. Leadership is fun and exciting. You will be with your Cub during a special time and see him (or her) develop and grow before your eyes. As well, the friendship and camaraderie you’ll share with other parents can lead to long-lasting relationships and memories.

Information on this page was adapted from Scouts Canada’s Grown-Ups Guide to the Cub Program.  The Guide in its entirety is available at http://www.scouts.ca/dnn/ForParents/AGrownupsGuidetotheWolfCubProgram/tabid/147/Default.aspx

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